Personal health tips

5 Ways to Manage your Diet for Diabetes part1


Since my diagnosis with diabetes at the age of eleven, my own diet has changed dramatically. I maintain my current healthy weight with a great diet/eating plan. If you do plan on losing more than about a stone in weight then I would visit your doctor for more tips on how to do this without risk.

I've had diabetes for seven years now, but to tell you that how I maintain weight is perfect would be totally wrong of me. However, I can advise you to follow my steps because I know what works and what doesn't. Before I really begin I must also say that I have been brought up by great parents who taught me to eat everything, and so I do! If there is something that you don't like, there are loads of other diabetic recipes and ideas that you will eat and appreciate.

I am a university student and I like to buy fresh and organic produce from where I live. I believe that this is important because it can be the most good for your body and contain more nutrients and vitamins than most supermarket produce. I like to source food from my fortnightly farmers market in town, which sells amazing meat and dairy produce and fresh in season fruit and vegetables. This is another important thing to remember, that eating fruit and vegetables in their season means that they will taste better as well as doing you good. I have a lot of influence from Western European cuisine (mainly France and Italy) as you will tell, but I do not profess to be a chef and everything is easy to make and very convenient.

I have read countless diet books and diabetic recipe/diet books, and I came to a conclusion that I think really works. I fused all the good things from the diets (but not from every diet) and sort of put together my own one. I call this my Juvenile Diabetes Healthy Diet!

The "rules" that I would lay down are as follows:

1. Cut back on snacks and then change the type of snacks you eat.

Certainly my biggest downfall although it wasn't really apparent to me. When I first started at University, I had little or no routine which meant that filling my day was difficult and popping into the kitchen for a snack, no matter how healthy it felt, was a regular occurence. This is one of the hardest things to do for some people, but establishing a great routine is essential to great diabetes care. The types of snacks to be eating are unsalted nuts, dried unsweetened fruit, fresh fruit, fresh vegetables (I love fresh red pepper and cucumber), dark chocolate (richer and nicer and you only want 2 squares usually).

ADD And College Students How Does It Affect Them


Unfortunately, Attention Deficit Disorder does not necessarily fade with age. Many people that suffer as a child will continue to suffer as a teen, as well as into adulthood. However, this disorder may affect people differently at different stages in their life.

College can be a difficult time for some students. For many, this represents a time of breaking free and starting their new uninhibited lives. This may be an exciting and emotional time. How does a college student with ADD face such a time?

For a person with Attention Deficit Disorder, this may prove to be a harsh time of transformation. Typically coming from families that were especially doting and accommodating to their situation, they are thrown in to a new environment to fend for themselves. One of the basic behavior modification techniques in training an ADD child is through structure, routine, and habit. At once, all of this is taken and it becomes the student’s responsibility to recreate this structured life they once had. Of course, a person with ADD is typically disorganized and unstructured. So, they may have a difficult time having the discipline to enact such stringent requirements for themselves.

Another aspect to consider is the increased difficulty in the academic load in college as compared to high school and the additional responsibility put on the students. Not only will the student be responsible for their own organization and structure, they will do so under more stress and academic pressure. This increasingly more difficult schoolwork is not made easier by the student’s general inattentive nature, distractibility, and impulsiveness. The very core of ADD makes college more difficult. With any luck, the student has spent enough time over the last few years regulating their own behavior that they will easily be able to in this new environment.

For the most part, the same steps should be taken in college to deal with ADD as was necessary in high school and other grades. To be effective, a student should carry some type of organizational calendaring system or digital organizer. In college, they do not hold the students’ hands like they do in high school – once an assignment is made, it is expected to be turned in on time, without reminders. Therefore, it becomes imperative to keep up with deadlines and dates. Students should also create structure and organization in their dorm or apartment and utilize the same skills they have been developing for years.